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Business, Client Development & Marketing

How To Pick The Right Career (Part 1)

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jimstroudpic.jpgIf someone were to ask me, “Jim, what is the right career for me?”

I would probably shrug my shoulders and say something like, “Umm… I don’t know. Probably the career that will be there next year and for years to come.”

 

What do I mean by that? Simply put, industries are hot one minute and then laying off the next. You can give your life to a particular trade and before you know it, you are replaced by some form of technology. How can you safeguard against that? Well, one way is to put your tax dollars to work. The Bureau of Labor Statistics is a government agency that studies and measures what is going on in the world of labor. One of the studies it focuses on in particular is Occupational Projections. In other words, they see what has been hot and by using statistical data, they make their best guess on what will be hot later. Let me show you how it works.

Step 1: Click this link and A) select a search method. For our demo, I choose to search occupations by keyword. For giggles, I choose “recruiter.” With that done, B) I click “continue.”

Step 2: I get a list of occupations to refine my search further. I choose the first on the list – “Employment, recruitment, and placement specialists” and then I click the “Search” button. (See the *asterix?)

What is the right career for me?

Step 3: I review the data and make a judgement call. This is what the data is telling me.

  • In 2008, there were about 207,900 Recruiters employed and by 2018 there will be about 265,900 thousand Recruiters employed.
  • Between 2008 and 2018 there will be about a 27.9 percent increase in Recruiter jobs
  • In 2008, about 1.6 percent of Recruiters were self-employed
  • Between 2008 and 2018, there will be about 112,300 job openings for Recruiters
  • In 2008, the average annual wages for a Recruiter was $45,470.00 which was rated “High” when considering salaries of jobs overall in their survey
  • It also states that a Bachelor’s Degree is the most significant source of education or training for this role. (Although I would debate that.)

    How to pick the right job

    So there you have it! Do a search on the career you are currently in and then in careers you may have had a bit of curiosity for. Ask yourself the following questions:

    • Is the average salary of the job I am considering fitting my lifestyle (or at the least, the lifestyle that I want)?
    • Will there be a significant number of jobs for me over the next few years?
    • If I ever wanted to make this job a self-employed business, what are the chances of that?
    • If a college degree is the most significant source of training, am I willing to devote time towards that goal?
    • BONUS QUESTION: If I am entering college now, am I studying (and spending my parents money) on something that may be difficult to get a job for later? What are the chances that I will get a high ROI on my degree?

      I hope this gives you some good food for thought? I look forward to reading your comments below.

      -----------------------------------

      Biography

      Jim Stroud is a “Searchologist” with an expertise in the full life-cycle placement of Executive and Technical personnel, Recruitment Research and Competitive Intelligence. He has consulted for such companies as Google, Siemens, MCI and a host of start-up companies. During his 3-year tenure with Microsoft, he served as a Technical Sourcing Consultant and was a regular contributor to Microsoft’s Technical Careers Blog. He is presently a Social Media Development Manager for EnglishCafe – the premier English learning community for global professionals which has English quizzes, online classes and more.

      Jim Stroud is also the Chief Blogger at  The Searchologist where he publishes a website, magazine and online video series dedicated to lead generation strategies for Recruiters.

       

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