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Career / Personal Development

A Job Board Doesn’t Work Alone

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sukishahSome of the top hiring companies today rely on online job boards like Monster.com to discover possible candidates for open positions; but the reality is that top talent is rarely hired from a job board, alone. For job seekers, posting your resume to an online job board is on par with randomly emailing a general resume and cover letter to hundreds of companies – and then failing to follow up to make sure that the message was received.

 

In order for job seekers to differentiate themselves to hiring managers, they need to be both personal and pro-active in their communication with possible employers. Some job seekers think that this means hiring an expensive resume writer, attending dozens of networking events, or even accepting internships for little or no pay. But, it takes a lot more than a fancy resume or great connections to get noticed and get that coveted offer; it takes hard work and creativity.

 

A recent example of both hard work and creativity stems from a startup called Ridejoy, a community-driven marketplace for sharing rides. While looking for a community manager, Ridejoy requested a resume, cover letter and five ideas about developing its community from each applicant. Like everyone else, Margot provided the required information. But, to make her ideas pop, she then went the extra mile and wowed the company founders with a dynamic presentation.

Another well-known example lies in Matthew Epstein, who wanted a job at Google’s product marketing team. To stand out from thousands of other applicants, Matthew created a website and marketing campaign to differentiate himself from Google’s other applicants, including producing and starring in a short introductory movie in which he talks about why he wants to work for Google. Although Matthew did not ultimately get the job, he received many other job offers as a result of his efforts and the subsequent publicity – one of which he happily accepted.

It has truly become an industry standard for job seekers to create multimedia resumes that incorporate a video or audio introduction of their work experience to help to showcase their personality, energy and creativity in the hiring process. Accepting an application that relies on video or audio to help differentiate the job seeker is becoming a necessity for companies that have relied on the resume as their primary recruitment tool for years. It enables job seekers to stand out to these employers – and it’s a way to get a truer sense of an individual based on who they are and what they have to say, and not just a list of their experience or qualifications.

It is about time that hiring managers look for new ways to provide job seekers with the tools that they need to differentiate themselves in the job search process so that the most relevant talent will have the opportunity to be discovered by employers more efficiently than ever before. Many have turned to multimedia to accomplish this, and the trick is learning how to filter through hundreds of resumes with this new element in mind.

Many employers have introduced pre-interview questions (whether via video, audio or written responses) into the hiring process to efficiently weed out candidates who did not put in the extra time or effort to answer these questions. They can then screen the remaining applicants based on how they have presented themselves for the job for which they are applying. Pre-screening with video has worked for many, including Monster Cable Products, the world’s leading manufacturer of high performance cables that connect audio/video components for home, car and professional use as well as computers and computer games.

Recently, the Monster Cable recruiting team was looking to hire an Order Management “monster,” or employee. Monster’s recruiting team usually posts job openings on popular job boards—costing anywhere from $75 to $419 per position—and then searches for relevant resumes in Google and on job boards. But, the team finds this manner of hunting for monsters time-consuming, and it often yields candidates that are not qualified for the positions that it is trying to fill.

Taking advantage of a new end-to-end hiring solution, Monster Cable created a job posting for the Order Management Monster position and immediately received candidate profiles for 15 qualified monsters, many of whom utilized video in their application. Monster immediately pinpointed one of those individuals as a “superstar” and reached out to her for an interview. The new monster’s first day at Monster Cable took place exactly one week after the team made it possible for job seekers to apply to open positions using video/audio.

This is unprecedented.

By asking candidates to share a piece of themselves beyond the traditional resume, hiring managers and recruiters can quickly determine whether these job seekers are a good fit, culturally, for the company. And, they can save time and money in the hiring process – and whether your company is a creative startup or a more traditional suit-wearing organization, that’s something that we can all get behind.

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BIOGRAPHY

As co-founder and CEO of GetHired.com, Suki Shah is a serial entrepreneur who has pinpointed the hiring process as one of the biggest hurdles in growing a company. He launched GetHired.com to reinvent the way that employers and job seekers are connecting in today’s digital world. GetHired.com combines the visibility of a job board with the functionality of an applicant tracking system – allowing employers to find and pre-screen candidates using audio and video, conduct interviews in real-time and manage the entire onboarding process. GetHired.com produces better-quality candidates, in less time, at no cost.

Connect with Suki on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/GetMeHired) or Twitter (www.twitter.com/GetMeHired).

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Growth in women's share of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) occupations declined to 27% in 2011from a high of 34% in 1990. While women make up nearly half of the workforce, they were 26% of the STEM workforce in 2011.

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